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Williamsburg Chromatic Darks

12 thoughts on “Williamsburg Chromatic Darks”

  1. These mixtures all look like really useful colors, but I am surprised you chose to name the last one Indigo. It does not look at all like the Indigo I use (in watercolors), and since that is a historical pigment I think this addition is going to confuse people……

    Reply
    • Hello Peggy,
      This color was created by Williamsburg’s founder and is part of the company’s heritage. Williamsburg Indigo uses a blend of pigments (Raw Umber and Prussian Blue) to roughly match the color of traditional indigo. Ours is definitely more intense than indigo dye. But, because dyes tend to have poor lightfastness compared to pigments, most manufacturers today use a blends to match that indigo colorspace. For example, our QoR Watercolor Indigo contains Phthalo Blue,Carbon Black and Quinacridone Violet.
      If you have any other questions or comments, you can email us at help@goldenpaints.com
      Thanks,
      Greg

      Reply
    • Hello A.C.
      Thank you for your comment. All of the blends in the article have the pigments listed for each color. If you have some of those colors in your studio, you can try to make small mixtures to find that colorspace, or email help@goldenpaints.com for more information.
      Greg

      Reply
  2. What is Calcined Yellow Ochre? And which Phthalo Green (YS or BS) was used/ thanks for all your good information Greg!

    Reply
    • Hello Don,
      Thanks for your comment. The manufacturer for the PR102 we use in Courbet Green uses the term ‘Calcined Yellow Ochre’ for their pigment, so we use the same nomenclature. Not sure why they chose to follow that naming convention. The term Calcined Natural Iron Oxide can also be used. Pigment manufacturers can heat certain pigments under specific conditions to change their value and color quality. For example, Raw and Burnt Sienna are the same pigment except one is natural and the other is calcined. The green in Turkey Umber is PG7 – Phthalo Green (Blue Shade). Raw Umber and Phthalo Green(BS)- lovely!
      Greg

      Reply
    • Hello Charles,
      Thank you for your comment. Most of these colors do not have direct equivalents in the acrylic lines. The exceptions are Payne’s Gray and Van Dyke Brown, which are in both categories. The acrylic versions may be slightly different in value and saturation. The closest green mixture we have to Courbet Green is called Hookers Green Hue. It is a dark muted green that tints to a slightly cool, minty color. Jenkins Green is also in a similar color space, but it has a warmer tint.
      We hope this helps!
      Greg

      Reply
  3. Excellent info, thank you. I am a huge fan of Turkey Umber. It mixes well with Cad Yellow and it is the only green I don’t mix. I was not aware of Courbet Green, but will be trying it ASAP. Thank again.

    Reply
    • Hi Mark,
      You are very welcome. Thanks for letting us know you are enjoying the Turkey Umber and how you use it. We are glad to introduce you to Courbet Green – Its a real beauty! Hope it enhances your palette!
      Take care,
      Greg

      Reply
    • Hello Pablo,
      We have a brush out for each color on our website, Williamsburgoils.com. You can click on the swatch in the color chart and see a brush out with each color diluted with solvent at the top, directly from the tube in the center and then tinted with white toward the bottom. We also have printed color charts with the color from the tube brushed to show the transparency or opacity. You can contact help@goldenpaints.com if you are interested in a color chart.
      Thanks!
      Greg

      Reply

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