Unique GOLDEN Products You May Have Overlooked

29 thoughts on “Unique GOLDEN Products You May Have Overlooked”

    • Thank you, Karen!
      When we were reviewing the range of products that are slow sellers, some were truly amazing to discover.
      – Mike

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  1. Permanent Maroon is one of my favourite colours. I will get some of the Quin Red Light, because that pink is lovely. Great idea to highlight these items, thanks!

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    • Thank you, Janine! I think you will love the Quin Red Light. It’s rather unique and not easy to blend otherwise.
      – Mike Townsend

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  2. You guys are the best! The constant experimentation, the specialized stuff.. all pushing the envelope of the possible. It’s exciting and reassuring to know you’ve got our backs, and that we can actually communicate with you so easily about our needs as painters, and your responsiveness- we are very lucky! Not to mention that it’s all of the highest quality.. I feel blessed for sure. Thank you!
    And I too was missing my Napthamide Maroon- just used the last of what i had so nice to know there’s a good substitute 🙂

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    • Thank you for your kind words, George.
      the Permanent Maroon is a very close match to Napthamide Maroon, so we hope you’ll find it’s a quality replacement for you.
      – Mike Townsend

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  3. How did you do that!? Just yesterday I was looking at pics of houses (with possible future purchase in mind). One house had a lot of features that were appealing, but the kitchen grossed me out. It was a mishmash of elements that did not work together and were unsettling. One item was a lovely patterned tin backsplash. The granite counter worked well enough, the sink was acceptible, but the cabinets were tacky modern (the doors could be exchanged for plain), and the walls… the walls were a very modern deep salmon orange. I was think how a nice strong neutral grey on the lower part would bring the elements together, with a lighter color on the upper part and ceiling. I was thinking that the right color would be like my drawing pencils. And then I thought about burnishing and wondered if that was even a possibility. Now how did you DO that? Your post today about Graphite Grey floored me. PERFECT. I sort of doubt we’ll buy that house- moving is at least a year in the future. But now I am entranced by Graphite Gray and thinking of ways of using it in my paintings. And betcha someday I use it in my house as well.

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    • Hello Annie.
      Maybe you had your cell phone next to you when you thought about this idea? (I’m kidding of course!)
      In all seriousness, the surface of Graphite Gray burnishes readily after it dries, just like when using a pencil on paper. I applied heavy brush stroke textures down to a thin scumble, and it all polished easily with a soft cloth. Let us know if you have any other questions!
      – Mike Townsend

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    • Thank you, Martin.
      I’m very pleased this article is helping shed light on some really useful products that otherwise seem to have gone unnoticed!
      – Mike

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    • Thanks, Nancy.
      I remember Jim Walsh was the first artist to introduce Quin Red Lt. many years ago. It’s just such a great color and it would be a shame to lose this one due to low interest. Great to see it’s in good hands!
      – Mike Townsend

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      • Quinacridone Red Light is an incredibly beautiful, subtle, shade of pink and not mixable to boot. It has been a total love affair for me and I often suggest it to students. Wondering why it doesn’t come in the Fluid Line?

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        • Hello, Tina.
          Thank you so much for your comments. I’m glad to hear of other artists that love Quin Red Light as much as we do! The reason we do not offer this color in Fluids is because it doesn’t remain stable in a thinner (low viscosity) formula. We have tried without long term stability. Some pigments are just stubborn! Burnt Umber is another pigment that we constantly are at odds with. Test batches of Fluids of these colors thicken up to the consistency of Heavy Body and that would pose an issue when trying to squeeze it out of the bottle!
          – Mike Townsend

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    • Thank you very much, Laura.

      The key to working effectively with acrylics is learning the various mediums and gels and what they offer you as the artist.

      – Mike Townsend

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  4. fun little “Trick” with Heavy Body Iridescent Stainless Steel Coarse,mix a little with your watercolor water..the con to it,it will make your yellows and reds a little Muddy..the pro to it, it will make all your watercolors sparkle. you just have to learn your balance to how you what your outcome..

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    • Thank you for your suggestion! Bear in mind that although you may be able to mix acrylics with watercolors, there may be a “shock” that causes speckles in the watercolor, as well as the binder of the acrylic is likely to reduce the ability to reactivate the paint layer and lift it from the surface.
      – Mike Townsend

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  5. This article came up randomly in my Google news feed. Though I’m not a painter, I am the son of one, and I keep busy with my hands as a woodworker and model maker. I just wanted you to know I read it with great enthusiasm. It’s heartening to know there is such imagination and curiosity inside your company walls. Odd that I’d never thought of that. Both the article and the comments (and the unusual products) got me inspired to (finally) take a class on color mixing and learn to paint.

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    • Hello Chuck.
      Thank you for your kind words that the article and products were inspiring enough to start painting! Many artists have yet to discover the myriad of materials that comprise the current offerings. Let us know if you need any assistance on your journey!
      – Mike Townsend

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    • Hi Jerry,….We do not have any coarse particle Interference Colors. We have Coarse ( larger mica pigments ) in our Irid Copper, Irid. Pearl, Irid Gold and Stainless Steel. And we have Large Flake Irid. Gold where the mica flakes are visibly quite large.

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