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Recent Lightfast Testing of Heavy Body Fluorescent Colors

8 thoughts on “Recent Lightfast Testing of Heavy Body Fluorescent Colors”

  1. Great article and information.
    One thing I didn’t understand was how the substrate affects the samples. What makes the aluminum panel sample different from those on the drawdown cards? Would the substrate material play a large role?

    Reply
    • Hello Andrew,

      For this testing since these samples were being tested indoors and outdoors the Aluminum was to have a substrate that could withstand weathering outdoors, the drawdown cards would not hold up outdoors. In a previous article on alcohol inks, which are also dye-based, we found interestingly that the dyes migrated to the interface between the substrate and the acrylic (gesso). So Lightfast testing washed them out completely, but when we did these as skins, we saw that the underside looked much more intense for color, so there was physically less color on the surface. With Acrylic fluorescent colors this type of migration is not seen, but it is interesting. Here is a link to that article: Using Alcohol Inks with GOLDEN Acrylics and Varnishes

      Let us know if you have questions!

      Best,
      Scott

      Reply
  2. Interesting that the tints were nearly as prone to change as the mass tones. Mixing the fluorescents with other paint, then, didn’t protect them much at all, which is not what I might have expected. Just one question: what is a “reflectance tint” and does it differ from just a regular tint (e.g., a mix with Titanium White)?

    Reply
    • Hello Lori,

      When Fluorescent colors are mixed with white they will still be prone to fading in UV as seen with lightfast testing. In a mixture, the less lightfast color would fade first leaving behind a more lightfast one. You could consider underpainting a color behind the Fluorescent color, for example, to account for this potential of fading.

      The Reflectance Tint is when Titanium White is added to a color to reach a 35% – 45% reflectance at the wavelength of maximum absorption (UV). So in other words, they are tinted in order to reach a threshold that has the most UV light absorbing into the paint film. A good scenario for testing, ensuring that the testing sample is really getting pounded by UV. So it is similar to a normal Tint in that both are using Titanium White, it is just to a degree specified by ASTM for the testing protocol.

      Let us know if you have questions! Help@goldenpaints.com

      Best,
      Scott

      Reply
    • Hello Joel,

      Keeping the painting out of the light will help to prolong the life of Fluorescent colors. So if you are storing works, keeping them out of the light can be helpful. Varnishing with UV Filtering can be very helpful as well for protecting these colors. The fading of Fluorescent colors is very environmental, so depending upon how much light they receive or the type of light (Tungsten, LED, etc…) it will affect them to a greater or lesser degree. Natural light tends to be much harder on them. We have not tested all lighting conditions or types of light, there would be a lot of variables and everyone’s environment would be different.

      We hope this helps and let us know if you have more questions at help@goldenpaints.com

      Scott

      Reply

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