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Home>Acrylics> Application> Artist Resources> Color> Primers and Grounds> Surface Preparation > Becoming Familiar with Color Pouring Medium Matte: It’s More Than Just for Pours!

Becoming Familiar with Color Pouring Medium Matte: It’s More Than Just for Pours!

18 thoughts on “Becoming Familiar with Color Pouring Medium Matte: It’s More Than Just for Pours!”

  1. I like the idea that this medium is “self leveling” is very interesting. As an artist on a limited budget the 20:1 ratio sound great except that the cost for a gallon of the medium is not cost efficient to use 20:1. So then the article shows different lesser ratios. If I followed the information sheet correctly the only difference in say 3:1 verses 20:1 is the gloss???

    Please Note the link https://goldenhub.goldenpaints.com/storage/uploads/pigment-density-of-golden-artist-colors.pdf did not work for me.

    Reply
    • Hello Wanda.
      Thank you for your comments. I will ask our IT Department to take a look at the Pigment Density pdf to see if they can understand why it is not working for you. Perhaps you could try viewing the document with a different browser and see if that helps.

      Regarding the ratio of paint to medium, paint typically costs more than mediums due to expensive pigments and the high pigment levels in our paints. In the case of the 20:1 CPM Matte to paint, this was done to create translucent, glaze-like color layers. You can use a much higher percentage of paint if you desire. We created a previous article that discusses the threshold of paint to medium, which does vary between product lines. If you over add the paint into the pouring medium, the medium is not going to be as effective in how it levels and in the dried glossiness, depending on the type of paint used.

      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  2. Hi Michael,

    How did you get an acrylic medium that doesn’t form a skin? Does it go tacky and then less tacky until totally dry?

    Does that compromise the paint film?

    Richard

    Reply
    • Hello Richard.

      Thank you for your comments. The acrylic medium does form a film but it doesn’t happen initially as most acrylic mediums will. There is enough water and other evaporates in the CPM Matte to allow the layer to shrink and thicken until it starts to form a paint film towards the end of the process. Therefore, it remains wet and workable for quite some time, up until it becomes too thick to have any movement. Soon afterwards the layer dries and becomes matte.

      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  3. I am wondering if the glossy color pouring medium can be used as the initial sealer on panels to prevent discoloration. I have been using the gloss medium but find it difficult not to leave brush strokes, which then require sanding and many layers of gesso to cover. I prefer to work on a very smooth surface! Is this appropriate for that use?

    Reply
    • Hello Peggy.
      Thanks for your questions. The CPM Gloss isn’t a great sealer for panels against SID, at least it is not as effective as the Gloss Medium in the testing we conducted. You may be able to improve the leveling and uniformity of the Gloss Medium by adding water (suggested max amount would be 2:1 medium to water). This will flow much easier and level more before it dries. It will also mean it dries to a thinner layer as well. Apply at least two or three coats of this and let dry. The CPM Matte can then be used with the Gesso, and brushed on with much better leveling. But as I’m sure you have seen, if there is physical texture from the brush strokes in the Gloss Medium, they will show through no matter how evenly the Gesso layer is. If that doesn’t help out, please contact us at help@goldenpaints.com so we can get more in depth with this.
      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  4. Hi Michael, I was wondering If you know the tool that was used to do the black drip lines in the first photo? I have been looking for something that drizzles consistent lines for some time now. Thank you! Great article as well, I always appreciate what you all do for the community.

    Reply
    • Hello Gage.

      Thank you for your questions and your kind words. The tool used to create the drizzled lines was an ordinary plastic spoon. It loads up the paint really nicely, allowing for fairly long linework. The other important tool is the Color Pouring Medium Matte. It has the right consistency to achieve the color flow.
      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  5. Was wondering if the Gesso and CPM matte mixture would be suitable for sealing cradled board for use alcohol ink?

    Reply
    • Hello Sally.

      Thanks for your questions.

      We have not done any testing with alcohol inks on the surface of the CPM Matte/Gesso mixture but it would be highly absorbent and not allow for the “tide lines” that many alcohol ink artists like to achieve on surfaces such as Yupo paper and glazed tile. The CPM Gloss and Gesso might work much better for this purpose.

      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  6. Hi
    I think I’ve just messed up on a commission ☹️. I put on a “last layer” of CPM matte, but it was too thick and dried unevenly. How can I salvage it? What would happen if I sanded it?

    Reply
    • Hello Joyce.
      I’m so sorry to hear about this happening to you. First, allow the painting to dry thoroughly to improve the chances of saving the work. Sanding the surface may help, but this is a very thin product when dry, so you may inadvertently sand through the paint layers below. But if you try to sand it be sure to wear the proper dust mask. The surface is likely to be sensitive, but apply a very thin layer of the Isolation Coat to seal the surface. contact us if you have any further questions at help@goldenpaints.com and if you have photos of the surface that would be very helpful.
      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  7. Thanks for the article! I read from a non-Golden site that GAC 800 and Golden’s CPM are (basically) the same. Are they? Or how are they different?

    Reply
    • Hello, Pam.
      Thanks for your questions. At the moment, the GAC 800 and the Color Pouring Medium Gloss are currently based on the same resin, but we anticipate improving the Pouring Medium over time. At present, the two products will perform similarly and a person who has GAC 800 currently can continue to use it.
      – Mike Townsend

      Reply
  8. Hi I am a beginner to acrylic, I have used liquin on my oil paints for a gloss finish. What should I use for acrylic?

    Reply
    • Hello Sidharth.

      Thank you for contacting us with your questions.

      There are many gloss acrylic gels and mediums that can be added, or applied over acrylic paint layers to increase gloss. I would suggest starting with applying the GOLDEN Isolation Coat product, which will increase gloss. If you like that look, then apply the Polymer Varnish Gloss to finish the painting. These products are applied at the end of the painting process, as sheen isn’t important while painting, as you can always adjust sheen at the end.
      – Mike Townsend

      Reply

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